Treatment for Anxiety Attacks & Panic Attacks | Orlando Therapist Shares Insights

panic attack, anxiety attack, cbt therapy, treatment, counseling, therapistOrlando anxiety counselors and therapists note that people who suffer anxiety attacks (also known as panic attacks) often state that their symptoms initially came on unexpectedly, as if out of the blue. They describe their anxiety attack symptoms as not being able to get enough air and feeling dizzy and disoriented. They explain that their hearts began beating rapidly and that they felt a crushing pain in their chest. In fact, many people who have a panic attack think that they are having a heart attack and when a visit to the emergency room turns up nothing that could account for these symptoms, ER physicians often conclude that these individuals have experienced an anxiety attack.   Although counseling for anxiety attacks is often recommended at this time, many individuals do not follow through with the recommendation.

Anxiety counselors explain that what often happens next is that the individual begins to experience almost constant anxiety, as they become preoccupied with worry about having another anxiety attack.   Individuals who were once competent, secure and active, begin to cut back so much on their normal activities that they often become confined to their home and work, and are afraid to be left alone. These individuals become preoccupied with and very frightened of their physical anxiety symptoms and fear they are going crazy.   The possibility of having another anxiety attack is so dreaded and feared that people begin to acquire strategies and safety behaviors that they believe will keep them from experiencing another anxiety attack. Unfortunately, these avoidances, escape behaviors and safety-seeking behaviors begin to dominate much of their life and their fear of and preoccupation with being anxious leads to a high sensitivity to anxiety that actually feeds anxiety attacks.

Therapists and counselors at GroundWork Counseling in Orlando utilize cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help individuals who suffer from anxiety attacks. With cognitive therapy, the counselor teaches the individual who suffers anxiety attacks to give up unsuccessful efforts at control over anxiety and safety behaviors by learning a more positive method to reduce the physical symptoms of panic and anxiety. Anxiety counselors and therapists who utilize cognitive behavioral therapy have found that individuals with a panic disorder can achieve a significant decrease in the frequency of their anxiety attacks as the person learns to recognize their automatic catastrophic misinterpretation of their anxiety symptoms, leading to a greater sense of personal control.

 

Finding The Right Help

It is important to interview your prospective therapist to find out if they are trained in CBT, and where they received their training. Some therapists are better at treating anxiety disorders than others. Their answers to your questions will be a good guide for you. You can begin by asking them about what types of techniques they use to treat anxiety. If the therapist doesn’t mention Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), or if they are vague, use caution. Be cautious of therapists who say that they use CBT but who won’t be specific in their techniques, or mention techniques such as ‘breathing/relaxation’ as these are not part of true CBT treatment. Be sure to ask about your therapists training and background in treating anxiety. A positive sign would be membership of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, or a member of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapists (ABCT). Look for therapists who have sought post-graduate specialized training or certification in CBT and can provide you information regarding where they received their  training.

Speak With An Orlando Anxiety Counselor
407-378-3000

 

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